Posts tagged ‘small town’

Farm Fun Barbie

Kids notice everything. I teach in a small school and wearing different boots one day garners a certain amount of attention so you can only imagine what happened when I showed up with blonde and mahogany red highlights.
Sometimes the phone rings and things get weird and that was the case with the highlights. A gentleman called Jason over a year ago hoping to rent a boar, not something we typically do. Bill insisted on the quality of his facilities and we finally agreed that we were, in fact, boar poor, and he could come inspect said boars. He wanted to meet “the boys” and see their offspring and so he arrived.
He and his wife were visiting with Jason in the farrowing barn when I walked in wearing a hoodie, rubber boots, organic material-covered jeans and a ponytail. Bill was explaining to Jason that he was a hairdresser in town and wanted to rent the boar and trade it for cut and color services for me.
“Rachel,” he said with a grandiose sweep of his arm. “You could come off the prairie and be pampered and we could give you Barbie Gone Bad highlights…”

I swear I saw Jason snicker but I can’t prove it.

Long story short, I went to town Friday and came back with blonde and mahogany highlights. No part of me screams “Barbie” or “Gone Bad” on a normal day and I can’t say that’s what’s being screamed after a day at the salon but it was big news in Karval.

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District X FFA: All the Cool Kids

I had the honor of addressing the District X FFA Banquet last night and this is part of what I told them:

In addition to my work with CFB, I also write on a blog and teach other farmers and ranchers to do the same through the FarmWife Project. This usually results in great tales of the happenings throughout the year on Colorado and New Mexico’s farms and ranches and there is rarely a lack of great photos. Last week, I stopped and took a few iPhone photos of dirt drifts I passed south of Karval. I don’t have to tell you how dry it is but I went ahead and wrote a blog post about the drought and posted the photos.

The blog post and the photos hit home and hundreds of people read the post. They shared it on Facebook and emailed it to different news outlets. Tim Andersen sent it to 9 News and they rolled into Karval Sunday Read more…

Through the Lens

The news cameras rolled into Karval yesterday. The filmed the new sign reading, “100 Years of Community”. They filmed vacant buildings and then they got down to business.
They met with Marc Hollenbaugh who told them the truth. It’s bad. There are fields and pastures buried in someone else’s topsoil. The dirt, the actual definition of displaced soil, sits in drifts over fences, behind windbreaks, over piles of tumbleweeds, behind every piece of sage, and around houses. Fields of green wheat are blown smooth, the wheat invisible.
They ran into Nelson Taylor who didn’t sugarcoat anything. This will cost him hundreds of thousands of dollars. His numbers are conservative. He’s tired of the wind. He is an institution in Karval and he is worried.
The cameras missed a few things that are harder to see. They missed the frustration each time a piece of legislation is passed at the “inconvenience” of rural Colorado. These are not people who can bear any more burden nor can they vote with any more passion. Read more…

From the FarmWife project, Jean Meinzer, Scrambled Mind

Today is tough. I’ve got my Bible open and I’m trying to read, but sometimes all I see are words. That’s not right. There is a meaning here. Last night, Limon police officer Jay Sheridan was killed in the line of duty. That cuts deep. First of all, things like that are not supposed to happen in Limon. They’re not supposed to happen anywhere, but it is the type of news we’d expect to hear in Detroit, Chicago, New York, and, perhaps even Denver. It shouldn’t happen in Limon. That peaceful little village was rocked by a devastating tornado years ago. They rebuilt from that and they will rebuild from this horrible tragedy. But the tragedy goes even deeper. I know the family. I know the in-laws particularly well. They have been my friends throughout life. Now what kind of words can I offer than can help in this situation? There are the cliches–“if you need anything, let us know”; “what can we do for you?”. Everyone is sincere when they say those things, but it sounds so cold. I want to be able to do something, so I am. I’m dedicating this blog to the Sheridan and Pfeiff families. Their lives must go on. They have to find a way to cope. I think of the new Rascal Flatt’s song that could easily be played on Christian stations: “I will stand by you, I will help you through, when you’ve done all you can do and you can’t cope; I will dry your eyes, I will fight your fight, I will hold you close and I won’t let go.” That sounds so much like God talking here. Yes, we can question God, we can wonder “why?” But isn’t it in these situations that God is testing us for all we have? He knows where the rapists and murderers stand, but doesn’t He want to see where we stand as Christians, to do things “For His name’s sake?” Two scripture verses jumped out at me this morning: “I write to you, little children, Because you have known the Father. I have written to you, young men, Because you are strong, and the word of God abides in you, and you have overcome the wicked one.” And the other verse: “Be still and know that I am God.” May God bless you, Tim and Penny, Heather and Firecracker, and all the rest of your family. Please know that we are here for you in whatever way you need us! We love you.

From the FarmWife Project: Grass Fire, Rachel Vermillion

It’s dry and there’s no denying it.

Bankers out here are graying at the temples and the elevator manager can’t quite get it all to pencil. Discs are parked, hooked to fueled-up tractors, lying in wait of lightning. Cigarettes. Flat trailer tires sparking. Fools.

Guys are talking like they’ll have to sell their cows if it doesn’t do something by the end of the month. There’s no grass and even though they’ve only fed a few bales, there won’t be any more.

Sure, the wheat is drilled but it’s storing just as well in the ground as it would have in the bin. I toss my little bucket of water on the poles just to try and keep the hot wire grounded. Read more…

From the FarmWife Project: Stuck in a Rut, Jessica Waite

I’m sure ya’ll have seen a two-year old throw a fit, now picture a 20 year old woman doing that. Make you giggle? Well this story I hope will make you smile because it has made everyone else I have told laugh bug, I didn’t think it was too funny at the time. The end of the weekend had rolled around and that only meant one thing, I had to head back to Colby for school.

All morning we drove around looking and feeding cattle like Abe and I usually do on any given morning. Noon had rolled around I was dreading leaving but I knew I had to go. Here is a little secret about me; I am a cry baby, like big time! Anyways, as I was packing my bags the dam broke loose and the river began to flow. I walked out in the living room, kissed and hugged Abraham and thought to myself “this will be the last time I see my baby for almost a month!” Drama queen, I know!! Little did I know I would be seeing him pretty quick. Read more…

The Argument for Ag Ed: Of Mohawks and Welding Helmets

More and more kids with mohawks have been signing up for my ag classes lately. Most of them want to learn to weld and I’m all for it.

When we returned to school after the break, we returned to the welding shop and my newest student, the one with the mohawk, began to learn to weld. He joined another student who was not your traditional ag student who was happily melded into the group. One afternoon, I overheard the two in the shop. Read more…